Robots Are Mostly Doing the Work People Hate Anyway

When people think of robots, they often think of machines equipped with artificial intelligence capabilities that will, at some point, have the power to rise up and overtake humans as they learn and grow. Sci-fi narrative aside, what many people don’t realize is that robots have been around for a very long time, and often not in the way that they think. There are different types of robotics technologies, some of which are the moving robots that Amazon uses to staff their distribution centers or are the helpers currently roaming the aisles of some Target and Lowe’s stores.

However, physical robots deployed in the blue collar workforce are not the only ones enabling businesses. There are other, much less conspicuous robots that many organizations are already using to exponentially increase staff productivity in white collar roles.

Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is where software robots interact with existing business and web applications to automate processes within a company’s walls. With RPA, employees have much to gain, including the freedom to focus on productive, rather than repetitive, tasks. Now, as these robots get smarter and easier to deploy, mundane work like reconciling spreadsheets of financial data or filing HR paperwork, will be a thing of the past. This will help foster successful employee engagement strategies by allowing employees to focus on actual data analysis to make the strategic decisions that benefit customers and companies to increase topline growth.

Manual work is torpedoing productivity.
From finance to billing to IT, employees across all departments are plagued with a slew of manual, repetitive tasks. On average, managers spend two full days per week on administrative activities and, in the U.S., approximately $575 billion per year is spent performing administrative work. Millennial employees would rather make $40,000 per year doing a job they love as opposed to making $100,000 per year doing something boring. There is inherent risk with that much manual work, and those risks range from process delays to unnecessary burden on employee time, to ambivalence, boredom and disengagement that leads to errors, mistakes and job hopping. Not only that, but when employees are short on time, they are less likely to foster ideas and make decisions that can affect the overall health of the organization.

As brands look for new ways to gain a competitive edge and increase customer and employee loyalty, it’s more important than ever to implement the right technology to free employees from the more boring, mundane aspects of their jobs, and many are finding that freedom in robotics.